For some time now, I’ve had the pleasure of using the Jabra Evolve 65 MS Stereo headset on my Lync client. I would like to share my experiences in this blogpost.

As you all probably know, the importance of proper end user equipment in Lync is vital for user adoption. All Lync users should have access to a Lync certified headset and camera. Without such equipment, the user experience is most likely to be degraded and the user adoption of Lync as a communication solution will suffer.

The Jabra Evolve series is a new series of headsets from Jabra which focuses on design and audio quality. The models comes in both stereo and mono editions, and ranges from the top model Evolve 80 UC with active noise cancelling down to Evolve 20 which is the entry model. All models can be viewed here.

My choice of the Evolve 65 MS Stereo was based on portability and the option to be able to work wirelessly via Bluetooth connected to both my Lync client and cell phone. The headset comes in a pouch and is provided with a USB cable for connecting to the PC/Mac and a USB dongle for Bluetooth connection(if your computer doesn’t have Bluetooth integrated).
Evolve 65 MS Stereo

Connecting the headset is very easy, just turn it on and push the power button all the way up and hold until instructed on how to locate Bluetooth device.

Once connected, you can start using the headset for Lync, Skype and music.

Personally, I like the concept of being able to play music from my computer while working and at the same time being able to answer my incoming calls in one device. The Jabra Evolve 80 MS Stereo is probably better if you have to “zone out” an focus deeply in a matter which requires your absolute attention, but the Jabra Evolve 65 MS Stereo works absolutely to my expectations in my regular day to day tasks.

Jabra Evolve 65 MS Stereo

This picture shows the schematics of the headset. The microphone boom-arm can be flipped to either side as it has a 270 degree adjustment.

The busylight indicator can be turned on and off manually, allowing you to signal to you co-workers that you are busy and don’t want to be disturbed.

Using the Jabra Evolve 65 MS Stereo

Using the Jabra Evolve 65 MS Stereo, Busylight indicator on.

Some organisations may have limitations in what kind of equipment the users are allowed to purchase in terms of prices etc. However, it’s of great importance that the equipment is of a quality that allows for good end user experience regarding audio and video. The Jabra Evolve 65 MS Stereo is by my opinion one of the best alternatives when it comes to headsets, and the price should not intimidate anyone.

My recommendation when it comes to Lync Headsets.

Tom Rimala:

Updates for Lync server 2013.

Originally posted on Just a Lync Guy:

Updates:

Download:

Fixes:

  • KB 3025563 – “Google Chrome no longer supports Lync Web App” message when you join a Lync meeting by using Google Chrome
  • KB 3027553 – This article describes the cumulative update that improves the reliability, stability, and performance of Microsoft Lync Server 2013 core components. The version number of this update is 5.0.8308.866.

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2014 in review

Posted: January 2, 2015 in Uncategorized

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 17,000 times in 2014. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 6 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Sometimes when dealing with certificates, a problem occurs when the certificate does not have a private key assigned to it.

In regards to Lync for instance, it’s not possible to assign the certificate to any services when the private key is missing. The solution to this problem is rather simple, and well documented in Microsoft TechNet but i still choose to write a post about it i case someone stumbles accross it and finds it useful.

Import the certificate in the MMC certificate Snap-In as you would do with any other certificate for the computer account. The certificate shows up in the Personal certificate store. Then doubleclick the certificate in the Personal view, and select the Details tab.

Cert_Properties

  • Copy the serial number from the cerificate properties.
  • Start a command prompt with elevated rights and type the following command:
    certutil.exe -repairstore my “serialnumber of the certificate”
  • Refresh the Personal certificates view, and you will see that the certificate has now been assigned a private key.

Ready to go.

Update:

Just to make it clear, as it’s correctly pointed out by Lasse in the comments, it’s not possible to restore a private key to a certificate without actually having the private key in your cert store.

 

 

 

Tom Rimala:

Staale Hansen of Knowledge Factory sums up the yearly report from Gartner on Unified Communication. Recommended reading.

Originally posted on msunified.net:

Is that time of the year again when Gartner releases their yearly analysis of the Unified Communications vendors and their offerings called Magic Quadrant for Unified Communications. The vendors evaluated must meet certain criteria which is a product portfolio that supports

  • Voice and telephony
  • Conferencing
  • Messaging
  • Presence and IM
  • Support for different client platforms
  • Support communications-enabled Applications

It is a tradition to comment on the Gartner UC MQ’s here at the msunified.net blog, and have done so since 2009. See the previous articles here:

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When you try to search for a contact in Lync which is not in your contact list, the client would normally display all matching results from your company’s addressbook. However, sometimes this is not working as expected, and you might be wondering why it suddenly stopped.

The answer to this is a corrupt user profile on your Lync for Mac 2011 client. Read the rest of this entry »

Script: Lync Certificates Report

Posted: August 8, 2014 in Lync 2013

Tom Rimala:

A really nice initiative on a matter that’s vital to Lync operations.

Originally posted on Just a Lync Guy:

I’ve been doing some troubleshooting lately for a customer which had some issues with expired certificates on his Lync Environment, and asked me how he can monitor or track existing certificates expiration on his Lync environment.

There are great tools out there which helps tracking and monitoring certificates in any environment (not only for Lync), the ones I had a chance to work with are:

The problem is that the first tool can run against an internal CA only which means it holds a lot of certificates or alternatively it does not include Public certificates.
The Cmdlet is doing an excellent job in providing the information we need, but it can only run against the local server which might be an issue for an environment with multiple Lync servers and pools.
The third option is easy and very detailed but it is running…

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