Busy-On-Busy in Lync 2010/2013.

A common challenge when deploying Lync in an enterprise voice environment, is to have the Lync Client behave as close to an “ordinary” phone as possible.

One common “problem” is the busy-on-busy. When an incomming call is routed to a Lync Client already in a call, you would want the caller to get a busy tone. This is, by default, not a function in Lync. To get this behavior, one would have to do it by using MSPL scripting as referred to in this article(not tested, so I don’t know if this actually Works) or use a Third party Application.

I’ve recently deployed this in a small environment using Busy-On-Busy from UnifySquare.

This is a fairly cheap solution, and it’s very easy to set up and configure. The functionality is also delivered in larger call center applications/suites like Competella Unified Communication Suite for Microsoft Lync.

You decide which is the best option in your environment 🙂

Lync client and Reverse Number Lookup(RNL).

I’ve had several customers and colleagues asking about reverse number lookup in Lync, but has not been able to figure out how this is supposed to be working until recently.

Came accross this article which set me off in the right direction(at least it’s working).

Lync looks at the following attributes to retrieve phone numbers:
“LineURI” (Lync Management Shell) / “URI” contact attribute
Telephone number attributes in Active Directory

This means, the contact has to be defined as a mail contact on the Exchange server(with phone number in full E164 format), which in turn syncronizes the information with Active Directory and Lync.

Lync doesn’t look directly into AD, but maintains its own copy of the AD attributes in the Offline Address Book. Make sure you force a sync first if you’d like to have up to date information.

Problems with Lync 2010 client and Trio Callcenter interaction.

I’ve recently had a strange problem which I thought would be nice to share.

The environment is Lync 2010 Standard edition and Trio Enterprise 3.2 from Enghouse Interactive. The Lync Client is used as phone app for Trio inbound and outbound calls. When a Call comes in to the contact center, the Lync Client should automatically answer the call when the agent picks it up. Likewise, when an outbound call is made, the Lync Client should automatically pick up the outbound call from Trio Agent and route it to the PSTN Gateway.

In my case, the inbound call seemed to be working fine, but outbound calls would sometimes make the Trio agent go in to a lock. The Trio agent would also make a callback to the Lync Client, resulting in a missed call from the very same number as the Trio agent uses for outbound call. This happened all the time.
Also, the employees at the callcenter complained about poor audio quality in their headsets and the Lync klient said “Your computer is causing poor audio quality”. This set me off in a direction where I started thinking maybe there was something wrong with the headsets.The headsets are Jabra Pro 9465 Duo, and there you go 🙂

I checked the firmware on the headsets in use, and discovered it was quite old. Installed the Jabra PC Suite and ran Firmware Updater. The new firmware was 3.8.2(the old one was 3.1.5 if I remember correctly) from Sept 2012. After the firmware update, everything is working fine.

Migrating from Lync 2010 to Lync 2013: Points to remember

This post focuses on some key points I’ve come accross when migrating from Lync 2010 to Lync 2013(causing small delays in progress :)).

  1. Static Routing: One of my first migrations took a bit longer to Complete due to faulty routing on the new Edge server. The static routes were created on the server prior to activating the NIC, which lead to failure to communicate. Once the routes were deleted and recreated, everything worked like a charm.
  2. Office Web apps has to be published to the internet using HTTPS and SSL certificate, otherwise you won’t be able to share Powerpoint’s with your federated contacts. Consider using the same URL for internal and external use because this allows for the SSL certificate to be used on both sites on the IIS.
    How to publish Office Web Apps server
  3. Mobility login: Problems with Exchange Web Services(EWS). Make sure Exchange Web Services External URL is set correct. Consider using the same URL for internal and external web services.
    This script provided by MVP Ståle Hansen is an excellent Resource for setting Exchange URL’s.
  4. External web services URL: Remember to change External Web Services FQDN on the new Front End pool, your web services won’t work unless you do 🙂
    Lync_WebServicesURL
  5. Client Version policy: Remember to allow legacy clients to login to the new Lync 2013 server(for Legacy). Default is Blocked for Lync 2010 Clients older than 4.0.07577.4103(CU6, June 2012).

    Lync2013_DefaultClientVersionPolicy
    Change Version Number to 4.0.7577.0108, Comparison operation to “Newer than or same as” and Action “Allow” to allow all Lync 2010 Client releases.
  6. This applies only to Lync 2013 on Windows Server 2012.
    After installing Lync on Windows Server 2012, replication between Edge server and Front End stops working. This could be as a result of the stricter certificate handling on Windows Server 2012. Check out this post by Terence Luk on how to fix this problem. Another solution to the problem could be found in this article by Herman Seminiano. Both solutions fixes the problem.

This post will be updated as I discover more points to remember during future migration projects.

Lync 2010 Enterprise upgrade to 2013, SQL requirements.

SQL_error
Topology Builder will display the following message to inform you of this issue: “The SQL server [FQDN of the server] already contains a SQL instance hosting role ‘User Store’.”
I recently discovered a small bump in the road when it comes to upgrading an excisting Lync 2010 Enterprise pool to Lync 2013 Enterprise.

The SQL server instance not only has to be unique to the Lync 2013 Enterprise Pool, but it also has to be on a dedicated SQL server not already in use by the Lync 2010 Pool.

This means, when upgrading from Lync 2010 Enterprise to Lync 2013 Enterprise, take into concideration that you would need a new SQL server as well.
The Microsoft documentation on the subject is not very easy to find(unless you search specifically for SQL migration scenarios), and even in this article http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg425764.aspx it’s not clear that the requirement for a new SQL server is only for an Enterprise scenario.

A possible workaround(in a small organization) could be to install Lync 2013 Standard Edition, migrate users and move the CMS, then reinstall Lync 2010 Enterprise server as Lync 2013 Enterprise pointing towards the old SQL server and then move everything back…

Your Call 🙂