Sometimes when dealing with certificates, a problem occurs when the certificate does not have a private key assigned to it.

In regards to Lync for instance, it’s not possible to assign the certificate to any services when the private key is missing. The solution to this problem is rather simple, and well documented in Microsoft TechNet but i still choose to write a post about it i case someone stumbles accross it and finds it useful.

Import the certificate in the MMC certificate Snap-In as you would do with any other certificate for the computer account. The certificate shows up in the Personal certificate store. Then doubleclick the certificate in the Personal view, and select the Details tab.

Cert_Properties

  • Copy the serial number from the cerificate properties.
  • Start a command prompt with elevated rights and type the following command:
    certutil.exe -repairstore my “serialnumber of the certificate”
  • Refresh the Personal certificates view, and you will see that the certificate has now been assigned a private key.

Ready to go.

Update:

Just to make it clear, as it’s correctly pointed out by Lasse in the comments, it’s not possible to restore a private key to a certificate without actually having the private key in your cert store.

 

 

 

Tom Rimala:

Staale Hansen of Knowledge Factory sums up the yearly report from Gartner on Unified Communication. Recommended reading.

Originally posted on msunified.net:

Is that time of the year again when Gartner releases their yearly analysis of the Unified Communications vendors and their offerings called Magic Quadrant for Unified Communications. The vendors evaluated must meet certain criteria which is a product portfolio that supports

  • Voice and telephony
  • Conferencing
  • Messaging
  • Presence and IM
  • Support for different client platforms
  • Support communications-enabled Applications

It is a tradition to comment on the Gartner UC MQ’s here at the msunified.net blog, and have done so since 2009. See the previous articles here:

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When you try to search for a contact in Lync which is not in your contact list, the client would normally display all matching results from your company’s addressbook. However, sometimes this is not working as expected, and you might be wondering why it suddenly stopped.

The answer to this is a corrupt user profile on your Lync for Mac 2011 client. Read the rest of this entry »

Script: Lync Certificates Report

Posted: August 8, 2014 in Lync 2013

Tom Rimala:

A really nice initiative on a matter that’s vital to Lync operations.

Originally posted on Just a Lync Guy:

I’ve been doing some troubleshooting lately for a customer which had some issues with expired certificates on his Lync Environment, and asked me how he can monitor or track existing certificates expiration on his Lync environment.

There are great tools out there which helps tracking and monitoring certificates in any environment (not only for Lync), the ones I had a chance to work with are:

The problem is that the first tool can run against an internal CA only which means it holds a lot of certificates or alternatively it does not include Public certificates.
The Cmdlet is doing an excellent job in providing the information we need, but it can only run against the local server which might be an issue for an environment with multiple Lync servers and pools.
The third option is easy and very detailed but it is running…

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After spending some time being frustrated over the repeated Event ID 32054 “Storage Service had an EWS Autodiscovery failure.” described in my previous blogpost “lync-server-2013-event-id-32054-ls-storage-service“, I finally came accross the solution for this problem.
Some of you might already know this, but I choose to post this anyway if, for some reason someone don’t. Read the rest of this entry »

In a scenario with Lync 2013 Standard Edition and Enterprise voice, I recently experienced problems with voice calls to PSTN users. All calls would connect normally and last for about 5 mins and 20 sec, and then it looked like the Lync client terminated the call normally(at least thats what the Monitoring reports told me). Read the rest of this entry »

Recently I came across a small problem when I tried to move Lync users between pools in different sites. The environment is Lync 2013 Enterprise Edition with full HA and HLB(Riverbed Stingray).

The Error was “Unable to connect to some of the servers in pool <name> due to a Distributed Component Object Model (DCOM) error”.

image001

All servers in the solution is Windows Server 2012/R2 running Lync 2013 Enterprise Edition.

Ben Lee posted an article abut the same error message in 2011, and the article is also valid for a Lync2013-only environment. The article can be found here.

PS: Make sure the HLB is configured correctly to handle all Lync traffic.